Auditorium Seating

Public Speaking Disasters and How to Avoid Them

Picture yourself sitting in a conference of about 100 attendees. The first speaker of the day comes to the stage to give their presentation. Everything starts off great. The person giving the presentation is wearing a lapel microphone, and everything sounds great. The first 5 minutes are perfect, everything is going great as the speaker starts walking back and forth in front of the room. And then it happens. An ear-deafening squelch that immediately terrifies everyone in the room as they jump out of their chairs. The person speaking in this case has just walked directly in front of the audio speaker. The number one “no no” in the business.

For those of you who aren’t familiar with how feedback works, here’s a quick lesson. When you speak into a live microphone, your voice is amplified and comes out over the audio speakers. If you stand in front of one of those audio speakers while you talk, the amplified sound coming from the speaker gets picked up by the microphone and amplifies it again, and again, and so on. This is what creates the horrible screaming sound.

So, here’s your first tip. Don’t walk in front of an audio speaker while you have a live microphone. Not only does it scare the living you-know-what out of everyone in the room, it can make you look like a you-know-what to everyone in the room. The last thing you want to do during a presentation is look unprofessional. It is absolutely essential for the audience to be on your side during a presentation. If you deafen everyone within the first ten minutes of your presentation, then chances are they will not be on your side.

Your second tip is to check out [http://www.avetiquette.com] for some great techniques to improve your presentations.

Source by T. R. Hill